New in-house STIs panels by real-time PCR

Published on : 26 July 2016

We are glad to announce that we have recently expanded our in-house molecular test menu with several tests and panels for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by real-time PCR.
 
The tests are performed at our flagship molecular laboratory in our state-of-the-art testing facility in ICAD Abu Dhabi.  
 
Please see the test information below and contact your NRL Representative or our Technical Support for more information and pricing. 

 

Order Code

Order Code Name

CPT Code

Specimen type

Volume

Specimen container

9912010

STI-7 Test,  PCR   

Test Includes:    

             

Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis

87661, 87491, 87591, 87798 x4

Urine

Vaginal swab

Urine: 10-30 ml of first void urine

Swab: One Aptima® swab or dry swab

Urine: Sterile polypropylene container

Swab: Aptima® swab or dry swab

9912005

STI-5 Test, PCR 

Test Includes:   

      

Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomonas vaginalis

     87661, 87798 x 4

Urine

Vaginal swab

Urine: 10-30 ml of first void urine

Swab: One Aptima® swab or dry swab

Urine: Sterile polypropylene container

Swab: Aptima® swab or dry swab

183194

Chlamydia/Gonococcus, PCR              

Test Includes:     

            

C. Trachomatis &

N. Gonorrhoeae Profile

87491, 87591

 

Endocervical, vaginal, or male urethral swab; first-void urine (patient should not have urinated for one hour prior to specimen collection); or cervical cells in liquid cytology vial

One swab (endocervical, vaginal, or urethral), 2 mL of a 10 mL to 30 mL urine collection, or entire liquid cytology vial

Sterile urine container without preservative or Aptima® urine specimen transport; Aptima® swab; ThinPrep cytology vial

188078

Chlamydia trachomatis, PCR (CT PCR)

87491

Endocervical, vaginal, or male urethral swab; first-void urine (patient should not have urinated for one hour prior to specimen collection); or cervical cells in liquid cytology vial

One swab (endocervical, vaginal, or urethral), 2 mL of a 10 mL to 30 mL urine collection, or entire liquid cytology vial

Sterile urine container without preservative or Aptima® urine specimen transport; Aptima® swab; ThinPrep cytology vial

188086

Neisseria Gonorrhoeae, PCR (NG PCR)

87591

 

Endocervical, vaginal, or male urethral swab; first-void urine (patient should not have urinated for one hour prior to specimen collection); or cervical cells in liquid cytology vial

One swab (endocervical, vaginal, or urethral), 2 mL of a 10 mL to 30 mL urine collection, or entire liquid cytology vial

Sterile urine container without preservative or Aptima® urine specimen transport; Aptima® swab; ThinPrep cytology vial

 

TAT days: 3-5 days
Testing frequency: Monday and Wednesday
Methodology: Multiplex Real-Time PCR
Storage: refrigerate

Clinical significance: 

Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis are 3 major STD pathogens.

Chlamydia trachomatis is considered as the most common sexually transmitted bacterial agent. In women, Chlamydia Trachomatis causes cervicitis, urethritis, endometritis, and salpingitis. A prolonged Chlamydia Trachomatis infection may result in tubal scarring, infertility and ectopic pregnancy.

Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for gonorrhea. If left untreated, it may develop into vulvovaginitis and pelvic inflammatory disease.

As a protozoan parasite,  Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis. Trichomonas vaginalis can cause vaginitis, cervicitis and urethritis in women.

All these three pathogens are also a significant cause of leucorrhea in women.

Mycoplasmas are small bacteria (0.2~0.3 nm) without a cell wall and are obligate intracellular organisms. The most common strains recoverable from genital tracts are Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium. Infants can become colonized with genital mycoplasmas during birth. After puberty, colonization with mycoplasmas occurs primarily through sexual contact. Genital mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from gravid women at approximately the same recovery rate as in non-pregnant women with the same degree of sexual activity. Mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas are strongly associated with infertility, intra-amnionic infection, postpartum infection, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), and histologic chorioamnionitis.

The current standard of care for clinical sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening involves the use of separate tests to detect the presence of each possible pathogen. Most commercially available tests only focus on detecting the two most prevalent bacterial causes of STIs: CT and NG. However, since most STIs do not show noticeable symptoms, it is a key to screen for a wider range of pathogens. Further complicating STI diagnosis is that different pathogens can cause similar symptoms, but the antibiotic treatment regimen may differ depending upon the pathogen. This complexity of issues makes simultaneous and accurate STI detection a major key to cost-effective patient care. Infection can cause vaginitis, cervicitis and urethritis in women. These pathogens are also a significant cause of leucorrhea in women.